We are dedicated to ensuring that all of our donors are well cared for and fully informed in every step of the process.
Frequently Asked Questions


1. How long has this procedure been in use? 

2. Will this affect a donor's future ability to have children? 
3. Are there any other long term health effects?
4. What are the possible side effects of the medications?
5. How long does it take to be matched with a couple?   
6. Are there "leftover" eggs?
7. Does the donor need to restrict her activities during the cycle? 
8. Is the egg retrieval painful? 
9. Where are the fertility practices located?
10. Can donors and recipient couples meet?

1. How long has this procedure been in use?

The procedure for egg donation has been in use for approximately twenty five years. In that time the procedure has steadily been refined and improved. There are now hundreds of cycles performed all over the United States every month.
 

2. Will this affect a donor's future ability to have children?

No, this will not affect the donor's ability to have children. All women are born with approximately 250,000 eggs. She is not "using up" her eggs.
 

3. Are there any other long term health effects?

There are no long term health effects that are known at this time. This procedure has been in use for approximately 25 years.
 

4. What are the possible side effects of the medications?

Most donors do not experience side effects. The possible side effects are similar to PMS (premenstrual syndrome). All of the potential side effects will be reviewed when you meet with us, provided to you in writing, and reviewed again at the fertility clinic.
 

5. How long does it take to be matched with a couple?  

Matching can take anywhere from 2 days to 2 years. The fact that it may take a donor several months to be matched is not a reflection on her desirability as a donor. It is a reflection on the fact that couples are usually looking for specific characteristics such as hair color, eye color, height, or even facial features that are similar to that of the intended mother.
 

6. Are there "leftover" eggs?

All of the eggs are fertilized immediately with the father's sperm and become embryos. Leftover embryos may be frozen for possible future use by the couple. Embryos may not be donated without the donor's explicit permission.
 

7. Does the donor need to restrict her activities during the cycle?

For two and a half weeks during the cycle the donor needs to refrain from sexual relations, alchohol consumption, and vigorous exercise.
 

8. Is the egg retrieval painful?

No. The donor is given intravenous sedation so that she sleeps through the procedure.
 

9. Where are the fertility practices located?

SFDN works with fertility clinics throughout the greater San Francisco Bay Area and Sacramento. San Francisco donors will donate at San Francisco area clinics. Sacramento donors will donate at Sacramento area clinics.
 

10. Can donors and recipient couples meet?

Donors and couples are given the option of meeting or not, according to their mutual preferences. These options will be explained in more detail in a meeting with SFDN. No information will ever be disclosed about couples or donors without their explicit permission.

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